A Sample of Scotland

I stowed away in Hubby’s suitcase on his business trip. Imagine his surprise when I leapt out of his luggage in Aberdeen, Scotland.

Twenty four hours later, and frankly I am not sure if it is day or night, I have been in a church that is now a pub,a church that is now an antique store, a church that is a restaurant, I’ve even been in a church that is a church. I have seen four castles, a college, been to four pubs, eaten haggis with bashed neeps and mashed tatties and Cullen skink soup, wandered through several cemeteries, been to two distilleries, eight fishing villages, almost been run over by a car (my fault and no harm done), seen a scad zillion sheep, some beasties, seals and a pheasant almost went through the windshield. I have been up the River Dee and down the River Don or possibly just up the creek.

Below a photo sampling of my day…or night. I have a new mantra which I have shared with some of you. There will be lots of time for sleep in the nursing home. For now enjoy a wee glimpse. Stories to follow.

Have you experienced any of the above….in Scotland or anywhere else for that matter?

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92 thoughts on “A Sample of Scotland

  1. Wow, that was a day! Beautiful shots too. I’ve seen a scad zillion sheep in New Zealand but you couldn’t pay me to eat haggis even though my maiden name is Shaw and I’m from ‘New Scotland’ (Nova Scotia). Looking forward to the details!

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    • Thank you so much! You perhaps also follow Restless Jo. She encourage me to try the local cuisine and I hate to leave any stone unturned when traveling. We ordered it in a pub the local folks go to and it came without its intestinal casing. Small mercies. I ate more of the beeps an tat ties to be truthful but did give it a try :)

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    • Mike I’m not sure if I can guarantee 3, well not at one sitting, but I will do my best. :) I am very fortunate to be seeing so much of this beautiful world. Thank you for the kind comment on the photos. Much appreciated.

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    • Kristin it was interesting because some of the sheep in other locations ran away but in this case they did the opposite, or at least some of them. Apparently the adults were being protective of the new lambs and not so impressed that I was ‘shooting’ with my camera.

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  2. Full intentions to visit one day primarily to experience a portion of the ancestral homeland, the Hebrides, a wild land even today From what I have read. Great photos, Sue and Dave. Brave girl trying the Haggis but good reason to have those 3 beers! Look forward to the follow-up stories.

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    • Allan I think you would absolutely love the historical journey. The amazing scenery, standing stones and castles the icing on the cake of the experience. As far as being brave I’m not sure but definitely didn’t want to miss a thing. Thank you for the kind comment and visit. Always wonderful to chat with you.

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  3. Gosh well, can’t wait for the suitcase stowaway how-to guide, although your lawyers may get to that one before we do, but in the meantime it looks great! (Not sure how fair that is, since you seem to have a knack of making things look great, but I’ll overlook it. I recall Scotland as looking great even in my pictures.)

    Have a fantastic trip!

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  4. Enjoy! Closest I will probably get to Scotland is living in my new house, which happens to be on Scotchman Circle. Thankfully kilts are not a required covenant in our subdivision. Can’t wait to read more!

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    • Sue glad to hear the move has happened. Great name for a location but glad about the lack of need for kilts. A wee bit nippy I think with the wind here off the North Sea. Thanks for the visit and very nice to see you again.

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    • Brilliant idea Wendy! He is quite strong and would be able to carry double the luggage I’m sure. Definitely add this country to your list of where a photographer can get a million fantastic shots…and I’ve just seen a corner of the land. You would be a happy camper. I’ll order you some haggis straight away. :)

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  5. What? No rain or snow? No wonder you’re disoriented, Sue! :)
    Did you enjoy your haggis and neeps? Converting churches seems to be a popular pastime these days.
    Lovely photos. I’m not at all familiar with this bit of the world so looking forward to more.

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  6. Jo we had a wee bit of rain at one point and I thought I might be blown into the North Sea off a cliff but no snow. Yippee!
    The haggis was all right and I loved the neeps. Fun to see sheep eating the turnips in the field as well. They seemed to quite enjoy them. As far as the churches it is great to see them being utilized rather than left to go into disrepair. I will say it does seem odd to be drinking in one though :)

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  7. nice pics – making me homesick !

    you need to visit Scotland for longer next time – and get over to the west coast, where the scenery is really breath-taking (but watch out for the ‘midges’ – which are like the black flies in Canada, only 10 times more vicious) :lol:

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    • Duncan you are making the West Coast sound very appealing :) worse than black flies?! Good grief!
      Definitely a couple of days in a country can not do it justice. We have two in London as well. Just seizing the moment and definitely hope to visit again at a more leisurely pace. Thanks for the comment. Much appreciated and always great to see you. :)

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  8. Breath-taking pictures! It’s unfair that I need to go through the hassles of getting a visa to visit this beautiful country :( Anyways, how in the world did you manage that day?! Hats off :D Looking forward to the stories, if you do remember them ;)

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    • Do you really need a Visa to go to the UK? I had no idea that would be the case. Is it difficult to get?
      The first part of the 24 hours Hubby and I went out for the evening. Then after a bit of sleep he went off to work and I met with a guide I had hired who was determined to show me every bit of the area. After ten hours of adventures I collapsed back at the hotel. :)

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      • I’m not sure about the difficulty but it’s definitely a process and I may have to live without my passport for a month if I am not willing to pay that extra 100 Pound!

        Aww, I bet you had an amazing time. It’s always good when you have an overly enthusiastic guide ;)

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        • I am always nervous about being without my passport. A hundred pounds? Gulp that’s quite the price! Well I hope you can make it happen one day.
          The guide was older than me, had a bad back and ran me ragged. Makes me think I need to train harder for these trips. :)

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  9. Love your story telling! And if you get to Scotland again, do go to the West coast, Isle of Skye and Outer Hebrides if you get a chance! Stunning scenery

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    • Thank you so much. The sun came out periodically throughout the day and that photo is late afternoon and the sun lot up the walls of the castle. In the short time spent I would definitely recommend Scotland!

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    • I love the accents however everyone seems to think I have a Canadian accent! Go figure. Thank you for your comment and supporting my food review of Cullen skink. I love that name an plan to use it in day to day conversation at home. :)

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      • Oh in Aberdeen it’s not just an accent- that would be fine- but it is whole different language! I am lowlander. Haha is being mistaken for Canadian good or bad? Don’t answer you have too many followers from both sides of the border I guess.

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  10. Wonderful. I have been to Scotland (home of my ancestors) several times – but never to Aberdeen. But these photos look very similar to some of the places I have been, especially in the Highlands. Look forward to the stories to come…

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    • Such a fabulous country and it must be extra special to visit your ‘homeland’! Aberdeen is barely mentioned in the guidebooks. I can hardly imagine how wonderful the rest of the country is if this gets little press! Thank you for the comment and visit which I always appreciate.

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  11. Scotland is a great place to be on holiday, however I still remember being there in August and it was so bloooody cold that I had to buy jumpers in order to survive. Oh I forgot, you are Canadian (with antlers) ;) you are used to this sort of weather. Lovely pics. Don’t forget Loch Ness, and take a picture of the monster. Have fun . Stefy.

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    • Stefy even with the gale force winds off the North Sea it felt warm or at least warmer than Canada! It was a quick couple of days and now we are in London. More stories and photos to follow after this whirlwind adventure. Thanks for the visit and comment which I always appreciate!

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  12. Sue, when we lived in London, my company had an office in Aberdeen (oil), and I visited quite a lot. And even though most of my trips were for business, I was able to get around a bit, and I really enjoyed it. My mates there always made sure that we found the warmest pubs, and drank the best beers. I’m sure they enjoyed my company, but I think they enjoyed my expense account more. Have a great time in London. Terri and I are envious. ~James

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    • I am smiling thinking of your time in the pub of Aberdeen. I have a post in mind about the topic, particularly the no women allowed one….no an unwritten type of rule but let’s say it’s a story :) London is jaw dropping for me as a first timer. So much history, so much to see, so many pubs to visit….a far longer trip will need to happen at some point.

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    • I am typically not so brave with food either but when I travel I try my best to embrace everything, including the foods. I draw the line at eyeballs of any kind staring at me :) Thank you for your comment which I appreciate a great deal.

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  13. Wow, you saw more of Aberdeen and vicinity in 10 hours than I did in a month back in the mid-80′s! Granted, I was working during the day and most of my evenings were taken up having a few wee pints with my workmates. Followed by the obligatory ‘Indian’, a midnight dinner, with the Scots invariably egging me on to go for the Vindaloo, a hotter-than-Hades dish, as they seemed to delight in the resulting facial contortions of one na├»ve or inebriated enough to take their challenge.

    One weekend I did rent a car and get away, following the River Dee or Don, can’t remember which, up into the glorious Highlands. Only manual transmission models available – that’s fine I thought – until I realized that I had to do the shifting with my left hand from the passenger seat. Thankfully, with the roads mainly clear of traffic, and the clutch and brake mercifully still in their expected position, I only frightened the wits out of myself and a few other Scotsmen a couple of times, but returned the car unscathed.

    The last night in town included the usual pub and culinary routine, this time followed by an outing to a whiskey bar serving fine single-malts. Some type of upsmanship eventually developed — who was to buy the last round? I really can’t remember whether it was Gordon or myself that claimed the honor when the establishment ushered us out about 3am. Here’s the amazing thing: At 6am I awoke to incessant pounding on my door. My Scottish mates were back, sans Gordon, to ensure that I was on my feet to catch my morning flight to London! An amazing display of camaraderie.

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    • What a month it must have been! Thank you so much for sharing the stories. I will say in my day with Duncan, the guide who ran me absolutely ragged, I let out a few squeals from time to time as I was certain we were about to have a head on collision. Oh yes, different side of the road :) I can not imagine driving, let alone a standard. Good grief it would have been disastrous.
      I love the idea of your mates ensuring your return to London. In my short time in Scotland everyone seemed so friendly and full of great fun. Definitely a spot to return to. Perhaps when we do our great genealogy trip?

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  14. I am very impressed that you were brave enough to try the haggis and Cullen skink. I quite like haggis with turnip and potato, it can be really yummy depending on the chef. I must confess that in all my trips to Scotland I have never tried Cullen skink. I think it is the name. Doesn’t really sound all that tasty, During your short stay in Aberdeen you certainly packed in a ton of sightseeing, no flies on you girl!! Poor Dave, stuck in all those boring meetings. Look forward to hearing about more of your Scottish adventures. See you in a couple of months dear friend.

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    • Hello my friend! Oh yes it was a whirlwind and packed time in lovely Scotland and in London for that matter! Such fun and poor Dave working away in Aberdeen. Just think Duncan could have run him ragged as well. :)
      I will do a post soon on the Cullen Sink soup which is not as bad, or as adventurous,as it sounds. the Haggis we had was quite mild and I was most pleasantly surprised.
      Looking forward to seeing you but heavens stay away for the moment as the bloody snow is relentless!

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  15. Wow, you packed a lot in 24 hours! Love the sheep – seeing the newborn lambs with their numbers always brings a smile to my heart. Not to mention how tasty they’ll be in a few weeks time. No, you’re right. I won’t mention that. :-D
    Jude xx

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